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of the president and the furtherance of american foreign policy. i'll have some questions later on policies and your views, including how you explain to world leaders how you could have been rooting for the boston red sox instead of what the world knows as the new york yankees as the team of the world, but let me say, mr. chairman, it's been a pleasure working with you and looking forward to continuing to work with you in the issues you've championed over the years. fighting global terrorism, preventing the spread of nuclear biological, chemical weapons, fighting for human rights and against hiv-aids around the world, fighting crime, corruption, drug trafficking and standing up, as you always have, for the interest of the foreign service around the world. in your role, should you will be confirmed, and i know you will, your portfolio will be greatly expanded, you will represent the interests of all of us, from securing our embassies and protecting our overseas personnel to promoting commerce, enhancing cross-cultural ties and keeping america secure through cooperation, where possible, and i
. it is a very powerful program. i get asked a lot -- what about the militarization of u.s. foreign policy? is africacom a guys to allow the into africa? is it really did get a presence on the continent? the state department of usa la st fiscal year spent between eight or $9 billion in africa. the department of defense spent a little more than $500 million. that is the dollar comparison in terms of what the level of the effort is. overwhelmingly, the u.s. government support in african countries. today category of healthcare, education, and agriculture. security is a very minor part, but an important part, but a very minor part. i think that is probably as it should be. the defense strategic guidance that i referred to in my opening comment tells me that in africa, we are to seek a light footprint and innovative approaches and low costs approaches to achieving the united states security objective. we have one base in africa. we have about 2000 people. it supports not only u.s. africa command, but u.s. central command and the transportation command as well. that is our residence on the conti
of a foreign service officer. learning about foreign-policy around the dinner table each night to this service in combat -- his service in combat in vietnam. less well known is the story of this foreign policy work inside dissonant. -- the senate. his 90 overseas trips that he made in 28 years on foreign relations committee, his work to ensure free elections in the philippines, his work with aids in africa, his work as chairman of the new start treaty and his very public and successful diplomatic intervention in afghanistan, pakistan, and sudan. historians will judged his senate years on his impact on foreign policy much the same way so many people recognized ted kennedy's impact on domestic policy. from his many years in the u.s. senate, he has developed a very personal understanding that we represent not just states or governments, but also people. i once asked john why he loves the senate. he said it is the pride he feels in trying to get things done for people. for three years now, he has been working quietly to help a father from massachusetts, whose two sons were kidnapped and taken to
as the front pages of the paper do you think that is the foreign policy legacy of his first term? >> i think it is. you can't really point to any successes. you heard him in that little sound bite saying we are going to lead. he has been saying the tied of war is receding. it's not reseeding. the tied of war is increasing in all kinds of places like west africa where it hadn't been. the dominance of the united states in the region ever since kissinger is receding. it is the absence of american influence and power which is creating a vacuum into which the jihadists are coming. that's the most important resistance of insurgents is it is in places where we didn't expect it like north africa. it is as if there were jihadists regimes or attacks in central america. that's now the europeans miss it. the number one issue is iran. the prime minister re-elected on tuesday say at the u.n. last year that in spring and summereh a point of no return at which he was announcing israel would have to act. i think obama is going to have to face that either to prevent the israelis in some way or to give a red l
relations committee, i think a great deal of what good foreign policy about is building personal relationships and building personal relationships with leaders around the world. and the one thing that i've really observed, senator kerry, of you is that you have done that. and we have had so many of these private meetings across over there in the capitol and in the small foreign relations room and i could just feel with meeting with all these leaders, the tremendous respect that they have for you and the ability you are going to have to build on that to make an excellent secretary of state. so i'm very excited about this opportunity for you and i want, in my first question here i wanted to focus on mexico and central america. during the last decade, relations between the united states and mexico have strengthened as a result of our shared security goals relating to the initiative. and one of the pillars of that initiative includes judicial reform and you know this very well. however, the federal government and many of the mexican states have yet to pass legislation which would cha
about the september benghazi attacks and some of the foreign policy challenges facing the u.s., including iran, afghanistan, and syria. he also talked about the vietnam war after returning from vietnam over 40 years ago, he testified about his experience before this committee. john kerry is introduced by elizabeth warren, john mccain, and hillary clinton. a vote on his nomination by the full senate is expected next week. >> good morning. this hearing of the senate foreign relations committee will come to order. let me ask, as i did yesterday, i ask unanimous consent of returning members to allow prospective member to complete -- participate in today's hearing. if there is no objection, it is so ordered. let me start by saying, you are not at the table yet, senator. we will have you there shortly. wow. let me say, mr. chairman, you are still our committees chaired, deeply humbled to preside over the committee today as we consider your nomination. we are honored to welcome you as the president's nominee for a position you have most deservedly earned. the first time you testifi
opens more than 200,000 jobs to women. >> ifill: then, we turn to u.s. foreign policy, as confirmation hearings begin for secretary of state nominee john kerry, two former national security advisers stephen hadley and zbigniew brzezinski weigh in. >> brown: paul solman looks at china's fast growing economy and asks, is it headed for a crash? >> wages are rising for the burgeoning middle class, but for hardscrabble factory workers: mounting protests against livle wages d woing conditions. >> ifill: and vice president joe biden hangs out with hari sreenivasan on google plus to talk about gun violence. >> make your voices heard. this town listens when people rise up and speak. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting.
boot on foreign-policy. bradley shear worker rights in the workplace. >> as secretary i have no greater priority responsibility. as i have said many times, i take responsibility. nobody is more committed to getting this right. i am determined to be the state department -- to leave the state department safer and more secure. it meant moving quickly to respond to the immediate crisis, but also to further protect our people in high threat areas across the region and the world. host: we will get your reaction this morning to hillary clinton's testimony yesterday. we do expect misses clinton on capitol hill again today as john kerry has his hearing to replace her. for the first 45 minutes, we will get your reaction to the testimony. what's being written and on television. this is your chance to weigh in on what happened yesterday. democ here is the front page of "the washington times." the headline says "tears and rage on benghazi." we begin with an exchange between the secretary and senator ron johnson. [video clip]journal > >> do you agree that a simple phone call -- that was a piece of in
and the further of american foreign policy. all have some questions later on policies and your views, including how you explain to world leaders how you could have been rooting for the boston red sox instead of what the world knows as the new york yankees as a team of the world, but let me say, mr. chairman, it has been a pleasure working with you and looking forward to continuing to work with you on the issues you're a champion of the years. fighting global terrorism, preventing the spread of nuclear biological chemical weapons, fighting for human rights and against hiv aids to a round the world. fighting crime corruption, drug trafficking, and standing up, as you always have, for the interest of foreign service around the world. in your new role, should you be confirmed, and i know you will, your portfolio will be greatly expanded, center stage representing the interest of all this from securing our embassies in protecting our overseas personnel to promoting commerce and enhancing cross cultural ties and keeping american security corporation where possible and isolation where necessary as in
at the kerry nomination and foreign policy challenges he'll face, with two men who've served as national security adviser to the president. zbigniew brzezinski held that position with president carter. he's now a counselor at the center for strategic and international studies. stephen hadley served under president george w. bush. he's currently a senior adviser at the united states institute of peace. welcome to both of you. first, zbigniew brzezinski, your thoughts on john kerry as nominee for secretary of state? >> i think he's an absolutely top-notch choice. very good. experienced, solid, energetic with a broad vision and with a strong focus on trying to stabilize those parts of the world that are especially dangerous. i think he's practical, intelligent, well informed. >> brown: stephen hadley? >> he's in a way spent his whole life preparing for this job and it's good he did because he takes in the a very challenging time and i think he's going to have a lot of challenges before him. i think one of them is to prioritize where he's going to put his time. >> brown: well, you know, he s
to u.s. foreign policy, as confirmation hearings begin for secretary of state nominee john kerry, two former national security advisers stephen hadley and zbigniew brzezinski weigh in. >> brown: paul solman looks at china's fast growing economy and asks, is it headed for a crash? >> wages are rising for the burgeoning middle class, but for hardscrabble factory workers: mounting protests against unlivable wages and working conditions. >> ifill: and vice president joe biden hangs out with hari sreenivasan on google plus to talk about gun violence. >> make your voices heard. this town listens when people rise up and speak. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour."
attack. joining us now, danielle pletka, vice president foreign policy and defense studies, defense policy studies, i should say, at the american enterprise institute. danielle, thanks for being with us. you wrote a column this week in which your first words were it's hard to like john kerry? [laughter] >> well, i worked for ten years up at the senate foreign relations committee when senator kerry wasn't the chairman, he was one of the other members of the committee. he's just not that popular on capitol hill. he hasn't worked well with other members. that was one of the problems he had when he ran for president. he's perceived as being stand offish, as being uninterested in their issues and in being kind of doctrinaire on policy. jon: but bob corker, the new mexico senator -- we're going to be talking to him next hour -- had glowing words for senator kerry in the hearing this morning. >> every senator walks into a hearing with another senator who's been nominated for something thinking there but for the grace of god go i. it's a collegial institution, but the collegiality is about
be focused on an unwilling to continue to support? >> well, as i said in my opening, i think foreign policy is increasingly economic policy, and we have an undersecretary for economic affairs, economics, energy etc.. i think that the state department historical use to have a foreign commercial service back in 1979. it slipped away. i think the secretary had the time -- i think that is something we ought to be doing in a very significant way. obviously working with the treasury with agriculture -- atta boy -- ag does and the treasury department does, and i think there is much more that we can do to augment our engagement in the private sector and their desires and needs abroad. i will give you an example. when i was in hong kong and number of years ago i met with our commercial service people. we had three of them. three people in hong kong. and they said they were overwhelmed. they had no ability to be given to mary rfp from china cummins writ with other countries. france was there, germany, england, others were much more aggressive in their promotion of their companies. and that is the wor
.s. foreign policy? we get some answers. >> brown: then, two military stories. we get the latest on defense secretary leon panetta's decision to lift the ban on women serving in combat. >> ifill: and we explore the pros and cons of drone warfare and examine the technology behind it-- the subject of tonight's edition of "nova." >> our mind tries to put it in rms of robot or human? but the reality is a mix. >> brown: we close with politics and a look at the way forward for the republican party, beginning with today's house vote to extend the nation's debt limit for three months. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill: secretary of state hillary clinton testified for the first time today about last september's deadly attack on the u.s. consulate in benghazi, libya. her testimony befor
on the foreign policy side. that's true. that is certainly a different choice for chief of staff when the economy remains issue number one. the fact of the matter is that jacob lew moving from chief of staff over to the treasury department and joe biden are perfectly capable of managing capitol hill and what needs to be done next in terms of bills and the budget and all of that kind of stuff. i think what makes mcdonough choice so interesting is it's a legacy choice. this is a man who has been at the president's side since the president's national career started as a freshman senator. he was there through the election. he has been at the white house all this time. this is a man whose loyalties to the president and who will protect the president, which is really the number one job of chief of staff. i think it's a very interesting choice and someone that the president trusts fully because now the president is putting together what will be these final years of the obama era and this is a man that he trusts to protect the obama era. >> candy, people might not know this. when the president gets that
the neoconservative phase of the republican party as far as foreign policy goes. most republicans in the senate and the house, like the american people, are exhausted by 10, 11, 12 years of war. obviously, john mccain and lindsey graham are on the forefront and have shaped republican foreign policy for a few years. certainly john mccain has. he is in a shrinking minority. and it's shrinking very quickly. and i suspect you're going to see a return to the realism of colin powell of dr. brzezinski, of brent scowcroft, of george h.w. bush, of the republicans who helped us and democrats who helped us through that approach when the cold war. >> and this is the post-superpower era, where there has to be some pulling back, and david said it exactly right. >> i wouldn't say post-superpower. you're right, it's a new era. it's much more indirection in our application of power. the neocons are for direct use of power. this will have to be more indirect. >> and there may be surprises there, as always is the case. look at what happened with algeria and mali. >> dr. zbigniew brzezinski, dad, thanks for not wa
. winnie stachelberg will join us. and president obama posing foreign-policy -- president obama's foreign-policy with max boot. and workplace speech laws were guarding social media. is the guest.ear >> finance started in the 1930s. it is really a spinoff as a self help. the 1930s is known for everything from the hard economic times to the 1930s, easy everything from alcoholics anonymous to getting rich to various social activists movements. fascism and communism start to be a big deal. porter develops personal finance. her goal is to educate people so that the great depression will never happen again. it is very much of its time, an idea that we can teach people certain skills and if they learn these skills, we will all be ok. >> the dark side of the financial industry with helaine olen. like us on facebook. c-span, created by american cable companies in 1979. brought to you as a public service by your tv provider. >> secretary of state hillary clinton was questioned about the september 11 attacks about that u.s. diplomatic post in benghazi, libya. a u.s. ambassador died in that attack and three
tradition that doesn't harm people and the arrogance by which the foreign policy traced to dictate terms and countries like bolivia less than 1% of any excess cocaine in bolivia and set in the united states. and the heavy-handed nature of the policy would think this is some kind of a flood from bolivia the way that we dictate terms in this country. now imagine if the united nations and the u.n. convention were to treat coffee the way with the content they treat coca what would happen if they tell oblivion's chewing coca which they'd been doing for centuries if not thousands of years imagine if they did that to the united states you have to give up this habit now. she was a major that went to elmhurst college, and in 2001 he comes by europe with the administration to secretly them coffee for one day without notice during finals week as a project so all these students get up in the morning and there's no coffee in the bookstore area sold on campus and they have friends dress up in trenchcoats as drug dealers. you want to buy a shot of espresso? $6. and people were actually buying this stuf
justice. dr. king was a fierce critic of foreign policy in the vietnam war. in his beyond vietnam speech, which he delivered at the york's riverside church, 1967, a year before the day he was assassinated, dr. king calledll the united states the greatest purveyor of violence in the world today. "time" magazine called the speech demagogic slander that sounded like a script for radio hanoi. today, we let you decide. we play an excerpt of dr. king's speech, beyond vietnam. >> after 1954, they watched us conspire to prevent elections which could have surely brought ho chi minh to power over the united vietnam and they realized they had been did -- betrayed again. when we asked why they do not leap to negotiate, these things must be remembered. also it must be clear that the leaders of hanoi considered the presence of american troops in support of the diem regime to have been the initial military breach of the geneva agreements concerning foreign troops. and they remind us that they did not begin to send troops in large numbers and even supplies, and to the south, until american forces had mo
in africa, and the challenges for u.s foreign policy. the attack on the u.s. consulate we're joined by former u.s. diplomat nicholas burns who served in republican and democratic administrations, he's now with the kennedy school of government and harvard university. and danielle pletka, vice president for foreign and defense studies at the american enterprise institute. with you and start with benghazi. was there more light shed today. where do things stand in terms of understanding what happened and the response to it? >> well, jeffrey, i thought it was a commanding performance by secretary clinton. she was well informed. she was a master of the detail, and all the-- and she took responsibility, which was the right thing to do. she said that she will implement all the 29 recommendations of the accountability review board. now, i think the republicans there obviously had a right-- and i think they had an obligation to ask tough questions because this was a disaster for the american foreign service to lose four people in one day, including ambassador chris stevens. but i must say jus
africa. this is going to be a large foreign policy problem, national security issue, for the administration going forward and there will be a lot >> we're expected o foll -pay provision to the bill, which would withhold lawmakers' paychecks if they failed to pass a budget and attempt to embarrass the senate and refocus thfit wi >>> this bill is a political gimmick. this bill was cooked up a few miles from here, when, frankly, the majority party said, we're in trouble, the people don't like us, things aren't going well, how do we fix it? well, they came up with this gimmick. >> well, that was thousands democratic whip, steny hoyer, hitting republicans on the no budget, no pay deal passed wednesday. after a bruising election, a tough fight on the fiscal cliff, and with even more fiscal deadlines looming, can republicans regroup? joining me now, republican tom price, vice chair of the budget committee and on the front lines of this battle. congressman price, apologies for my voice. i'll try to keep my questions short. >> nice hearing your voice today, chuck, so good hea
states foreign policy tries to dictate terms to places like bolivia, less than 1% of excess cocaine in bolivia with ends up in the united states. and yet the heavyhanded nature of u.s. policy, you would think this was some kind of flood coming from bolivia the way we dictate terms to that country. and so, now, imagine if the united nations and the audience of the u.n. convention were to treat coffee the way, with the contempt they treat coca, right? what would happen if they -- and they've told bolivians and peruvians you have to stop chewing coca which they've been doing for centuries, if not thousands of years. imagine if they did that to the united states, you know, coffee, you have to give up this habit now. what would happen? well, a friend of mine actually did this. he was a performance art major, andrew. he went to amherst college, and in 2001 he conspire with the the school administration and student government to secretly ban coffee or for one day without notice during finals week as a performance art project. so all these students get up in the morning, and there's no coff
foreign policy and american values and interests to every leader around the world. you have changed the face of america abroad and extended the hospitable reach of our nation to ordinary citizens in addition to world leaders. during your tenure you have steered us through economic crisis in europe, changing relations with asia, regime change in the arab world are a mow moen to us transition in -- momentous transition in libya and global strength based on economics, rather than arms. i personally appreciate the fact you used your office to aggressively implement sanctions against iran. in addition to these priorities and nearly every trip which you have i think the most traveled secretary in history you also supported, met with and provide ad voice to those individuals that don't live in the limelight. women, children, the lgbt community and religious minorities. made a real difference in the personal lives of so many people and for that you have the thanks of a grateful nation. i know you will not go gently from the world stage and i look foreward to working closely with you in the
on counts issues, ensuring the diplomacy is an essential part of our country's foreign policy. and your tireless efforts to elevate women and girls' rights is without comparison. you have strengthened our state department, made it better today than when you arrived. as ranking member on the africa subcommittee, i am especially appreciative of the attention you've given to the 54 congratulations -- nations of africa. while aftercation ca may lose one -- while africa may lose one of its champions at the state department, i trust africa will not be far from your thoughts and will remain a top priority in your exueture -- in your future work. i also want to associate my comments with congressman sherman who said that it's unfortunate that this is the last time we will hear from you. so i want to focus my time on moving us forward and asking your advice. you made reference in your testimony about best value contracts. and you mentioned, i believe, several nations where best value contracts are not used. and in thinking about africa and the instability and a number of nations in northern afri
's foreign policy. the foreign policy is what difference does it make? hey, what difference does it make if we give our sworn enemies, people who want to wipe israel and us off the map, so we give them the method to wipe them out? what's the big deal? >> brian: what do you say to people who say hue bark wasn't a benevolent dictator even though he was good to us. should we have not been giving egypt aid all those years? >> we were not interfering with the internal situation in these countries, but mubarak had agreements with this country. this administration throws our allies under the bus. they've done it with the northern alliance that fought the taliban in afghanistan. they did it with poland. we'd deal with them for defensive weapons. they've done it repeatedly and as a west african told me when i was over there a couple of years ago, he said, we were so excited when you elected a black president. but please, tell people in washington stop getting weaker. the world sees you getting weaker! don't do that. you put us in jeopardy. we're putting ourselves in jeopardy when we're sending je
far into foreign policy that it's inevitable that we're going to find places where we have funded people who are actually against us. as you know, i'm for less foreign involvement. >> another question from the web. the president talked about climate change. not something obviously that we've heard a lot about in the debates you've been discussing for the past hour or so. your thoughts on where this might go in this 113th congress. >> my instinct is what you heard in the president's inauguration speech, he was trying to basically throw a bone to every left wing activist group he could. and so start to think about this more from this white house. they've received so much pressure from labor and from those of us who, you know, want the economy to grow on things like the keystone pipeline. >> i think it's a company that wants money like solyndra. >> but you start to see the game being played. this goes back to my earlier discussion if you actually just read the speech and wrote side notes on it saying, oh this is for this constituency, this is to make this group money, oh, but if i do
and nuclear test. let's bring in our expert now of foreign defense policy at the american enterprise institute. michael, let's just go here. so is kim jong-un, if he is trying to prove that he is not afraid of the big bad wolf, that being the u.s. or is this another attention grabber? what is it that he wants from the united states? take any money, because it's not going to get it. >> yesterday shown that he is not afraid by launching his missile in december. and also china before that back in april. i'm not so sure why north korea is upset about this. it's empty and it doesn't do anything but previous extender thing. there is no reason to do so. they are not doing anything about the north korean provocations. >> this guy has to raise his own head and try to get some attentions. let's talk about the people that might be watching. japan is right there and we are talking about proximity. we are talking about how much attention they can get. they are hoping for a response. then there is china who is north korea's major ally in terms of diplomacy. but china is now saying that kim jong-un is backin
that we now depend on ongoing financial assistance from foreign countries to finance our country's reckless policies. this is robbing our cities and states of critical investments and infrastructure like bridges, ports and levees. every dollar we pay in interest is a dollar that is not going to investment in america's priorities. instead, interest payments are a significant tax on all americans, a debt tax, that washington doesn't want to talk about. increasing america's debt weakens domestically and internationally. leadership means that the buck stops here. instead, washington is shifting the burden on bad choices today onto the backs of our children and grandchildren. america has a debt problem. and a failure of leadership. americans deserve better. all of those words were taken from then senator obama's statement before he voted against raising the debt ceiling in 2006. truer words cannot have been spoken today. the debt burden the president was concerned about a few years ago is still a very real threat today. congress should pass a responsible budget so we have a road map t
Search Results 0 to 40 of about 41 (some duplicates have been removed)

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